Archive | February, 2014

NBC vs. BBC – The Olympics Ad Battle for Ratings Gold

9 Feb

Olympics Means Ends  Collage  

     Let the games begin.  As athletes from across the globe battle each other, there’s another global battle for viewers to watch them.

     NBC and the BBC have taken two differing approaches.  Both are grounded in successful communication appraisal theory to lead the viewer on a narrative journey to elicit an emotional response to watch broadcasts of the games.  But creatively, they appeal to differing emotions and values.   One appeals to humanity, the other to mythology.

     The BBC approach paints a narrative of battling the Gods.

 

      NBC takes a differing tactic, instead appealing to the narrative of human competition.

      Both promotional efforts are creative and emotionally effective.   But the BBC message is decidedly different than what American audiences are used to seeing and perhaps creates a stronger attitudinal conversion to watch the games.  

Figure 1 - Means-Ends Model

Figure 1 – Means-Ends Model

     The difference is easy to see when we break down the ads into a simple means-ends ladder analysis.   At the bottom of the ladder, both promotional ads are grounded with the attributes of athletic competition and sports.   But where they differ is in the narrative focal goals.  NBC takes a man vs. man approach, where the BBC chooses man vs. nature. (Figure 1)  Those opposing tracts create two powerfully different higher level value propositions, one based on unity and happiness, the other based on immortality.

      Arguably, the BBC approach takes the viewer on a deeper cognitive journey forcing one to think more intensely about the relationship between man and nature.  After all, it’s a given that men and women will defeat each other in the field of competition, but the real prize is whether they can defeat the Gods.   The elaborative journey of the “climbing the mountain” narrative combined with the higher level value of living forever is a powerful proposition.  

       The mountains are calling.  It’s time to watch.

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Four Best Super Bowl Ads That Were Anything But Boring

3 Feb

Super Bowl 2014 Collage

     The big game is over.  More than 96 million viewers watched Denver and GoDaddy embarrass themselves.   At the same time Seattle re-wrote the rules on what it takes to be champions, and in between some of the world’s most powerful brands helped reshape our attitudes and beliefs on what it means to be Americans.   We are a country that builds great cars, embodies diversity, welcomes home our troops, and yes, swoons over puppies. 

General Mills' Super Bowl ad "Gracie."

General Mills’ Super Bowl ad “Gracie.”

      This was the year when several brands and their agencies appeared to turn a creative corner.  The bondage of uninspired play-it-safe advertising brought on by the Great Recession has loosened its grip.  Yes, there were still moments where it appeared the messaging was written by 13 years old boys (I’m looking at you, Butterfinger), but there were many more examples of creative bravery, among them Cheerios’ “Gracie.”   

      There are a multitude of post-game rankings sizing up the Super Bowl XLVIII ads, this one is merely an analysis of three that exemplified creative and strategic brand communication, and one that excelled in extending viewer engagement beyond the TV screen.   

     Part of the mark of a confident and strong brand is consistency.   We clearly saw that in two exceptional ads from Chrysler and Coca-Cola.   Since the easing of the Great Recession, Chrysler has positioned itself as America’s “comeback kid.”  It’s given us Eminem, Paul Harvey, and Clint Eastwood who proclaimed it “Halftime in America.”  This year Chrysler gave us Bob Dylan, another American original to say, “You can’t import originality.” 

      The Bob Dylan ad strikes at an important business insight and a critical strategic value proposition: Nobody builds cars better than America, and nobody in America builds cars better than Chrysler.   Using Dylan as the human metaphor for originality and legacy makes the proposition especially salient.   

         Another original American brand reminded us that what makes us original is our differences. Coca-Cola hit the mark with its ad called “It’s Beautiful.”  As one of the world’s most recognized brands with assets in virtually every country, Coca-Cola embodies diversity.   What Coke is selling here is acceptance, empowerment and the happiness that comes when you embrace shared moments—and a Coke—with others.   Its ad by Wieden + Kenney is a powerful brand extension that bravely comes from one the few brands strong enough to pull it off.

     Brave communication was not just cornered by Coca-Cola.   Chevy Silverado leveraged a lot of its own brand equity to say something about cancer—without speaking a word.   

      The silent schema of a solemn ride down a country road in a Silverado pickup  forces the viewer to cognitively elaborate about what is and what is not happening.    The three most powerful cues:  the shaved head, the teary eye, and the embraced hands.   Together they force the viewer to create their own story, form their own attitude, and create the belief that they can take action by supporting the American Cancer Society’s Purple Roads campaign.   The underlying message is not about the truck, but the journey of strength the truck allows one to take.  It’s emotional, powerful, and strategic.

 

     Finally, Toyota’s Super Bowl campaign is notable for not what it did on the TV screen, but what it did on other screens. 

Picture 2 - Swedish Chef telling fellow Muppets they're heading to the "Sferndy Boom."  (Super Bowl)

Picture 1 – Swedish Chef telling fellow Muppets they’re heading to the “Sferndy Boom.” (Super Bowl)

     Toyota’s agency Saachi & Saachi employed the Muppets for a campaign to promote the all-new Highlander SUV targeted strategically at upwardly mobile parents with chaotic families.   And who better to symbolize a loveable, dysfunctional American family than the Muppets?  The unique selling proposition of the campaign is that the Highlander has room for everything inside but boring.   

    To prove their point, Toyota branched out on three separate channels to engage viewers in its “No Room for Boring” campaign.   It started with a YouTube video announcing a road trip to the Super Bowl that of course, went terribly wrong.  (Picture 1)

     The Muppets also took to Twitter taking over the Toyota page to actively engage with Super Bowl viewers during the game. (Figure 1) 

Figure 1 - Interactive Tweets with Pepe and the Muppets on @Toyota

Figure 1 – Interactive Tweets with Pepe and the Muppets on @Toyota

    Finally, the Muppets used Vine to send several short videos of Pepe trying to watch the game from the back of the Highlander.

Picture 1 - Blotz family Tweeting during Super Bowl.

Picture 2 – Blotz family Tweeting during Super Bowl.

      The strategic insight in all of this is that the Super Bowl is no longer a TV-only event.   It’s a multi-screen interactive social village where viewers share and exchange the experience on Twitter, Facebook and other social channels.  It happened even in my own house by evidence of the Instagram picture shared by my wife with her caption, “Remember when people WATCHED the @SuperBowl?”  Guilty as charged. (Picture 2)  During the broadcast, Twitter reported 24.9 million Tweets, that’s 800,000 more than Super Bowl XVLII.

     As the price for Super Bowl ads continues to climb, Toyota’s foray into interactive space is the model more brands are likely to copy.   Not only does it create for a more entertaining and meaningful brand experience, it’s also relatively free.

      Four brands, four distinct messages.   Unlike Denver, they brought their A-game.

  *          *          *

      For more expert analysis of the Super Bowl ads, I invite you to follow John Eighmey’s The Psychology of Advertising.     

Fire up Twitter—The Muppets are Driving to the Sferndy Boom (That’s Swedish Chef Speak for Super Bowl)

1 Feb

  

      Leave it to the Muppets to blow up the tired Super Bowl advertising cliche of talking babies, dogs, and bikini-clad women.

      Perhaps one of the more ingenious advertising campaigns for Super Bowl XLVIII is one that will take viewers of the big game on a virtual ride and let them interact with a brand in a different and entertaining way.

      The Muppets have climbed behind the wheel of the new Toyota Highlander for a road trip of misadventure to New Jersey and have invited all of us to come along.  They’ll live-Tweet during the game using the @Toyota Twitter account and the #NoRoomForBoring hashtag.  

Swedish Chef explaining how the Muppets are heading the "Sferndy Boom."

Swedish Chef explaining how the Muppets are heading the “Sferndy Boom.”

      This is exponentially more than just a piece of social media entertainment.  It’s actually part of a well-orchestrated and highly strategic effort on behalf of Toyota and its agency Saatchi & Saatchi to build awareness and market share for Toyota’s newly remodeled Highlander SUV.   The live-Tweeting coincides with a new commercial that will air during the game featuring the Muppets and former NLF star Terry Crews.  

 

        The campaign is strategic because it zeroes in like a laser beam on a specific target audience: busy, chaotic, upwardly mobile families.  Metaphorically, no family exemplifies that target audience more than the Muppets—America’s very definition of loveable dysfunction.    Furthermore, the adventure they drive Terry Crews through is the archetype of the great American family vacation, foibles and all.   The key branding message is that the new Highlander has room inside for everything but boredom. 

       Even the live-Tweeting during the game is no accident.  It fills what marketers now call “the space in-between” traditional and digital advertising.  In other words, allowing the consumer to customize their own brand experience—in this case interacting with the Muppets in social space.   Wisely, Toyota has even re-branded its Twitter page and its Highlander website with the Muppets so that consumers are given a consistent message with every interactive touch point.  (Figure 1) 

Figure 1 -  Toyota's Twitter and Highlander pages

Figure 1 – Toyota’s Twitter and Highlander pages

       In this regard, it’s a smart way to help Toyota differentiate itself from the other Super Bowl car advertisers by engaging viewers on multiple channels at the same time.   The Muppet’s live-Tweets will make Toyota part of the conversation during what will be among the highest Twitter user events of the year.  (24.1 million Tweets during Super Bowl XLVII)  It’s also an effective way to ensure that Toyota is getting more for its $4 million ad buy.

       It’s part of a new trend of what I call fake-celebrity endorsements.  Comic Will Ferrell created this new genre with the highly successful Ron Burgundy commercials  for the Dodge Durango.  It was all part of a highly integrated campaign to not only sell Dodges, but to cross-promote the new Ron Burgundy Anchorman movie.   Likewise, the Disney and the Muppets are using the same kind of cross-promotion for its new movie opening in March.

       Toyota hopes it sells Highlanders, too.   For the rest of us, it’s a fun and new way to experience the Sferndy Boom—or whatever you call it.

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